Book Chapter

Knight, L., Gray, E. & Blaise, M. (2020). Powerful dressing: Artfully challenging sexism in the academy. In C. Taylor, C. Hughes, and J. Ulmer (Eds). Transdisciplinary feminist research approaches: Innovations in theory, method, and practice (pp. 43-58). London: Routledge.

https://www.routledge.com/Transdisciplinary-Feminist-Research-Innovations-in-Theory-Method-and/Taylor-Ulmer-Hughes/p/book/9780367190040

ECU Lecture Series

2 October 2019

Professor Mindy Blaise will discuss how conventional early childhood education methods can be approached differently, to help solve issues around environmental degradation and climate change.

Drawing from an ecologically responsive inquiry of children’s relations with water, she will show how encounters with the Black Swan activate new pedagogies that can extend reparative possibilities and alternative futures.

Professor Blaise, from ECU’s School of Education, is part of an international research team looking to re-envision traditional managerial waste practices in locally meaningful ways. Her interdisciplinary and multisensory project aims to change the ways children relate with waste, water, and weather.

Book Chapter

Chapter 10 | 13 pages
Listening to and Telling a Rush of Unruly Natureculture Gender Stories
Mindy Blaise & Tonya Rooney

Drawing from a multispecies walking ethnography of child-weather relations that took place on Ngunnawal Country, Canberra, Australia, this chapter experiments with ways of telling gender stories that are not just human stories. Feminist common world methods are used to find new ways to be curious and tell stories that put unpredictable encounters at the center of things. By paying attention to children’s relations with the more-than-human world, the usual narratives on gender are retold through natureculture gender stories. Learning how to listen to and tell unruly natureculture gender stories is a tactic for considering gender that is neither limited nor caught up in a binary logic.